The 15 Best Web Apps You’ve Never Heard Of

If popularity were a reliable indicator of a product’s greatness, the Big Mac would be the world’s best burger, Coca-Cola would be nutritious, and Microsoft wouldn’t have to spend billions to convince you to buy its software. Savvy computer users know that sometimes the best program is the one you haven’t yet used. So when we set out to find the ultimate online apps, we skipped the big sites that everyone already knows.

Sure, you can track your schedule with Google Calendar, watch videos on YouTube, and share pictures with friends on Flickr, but while these popular web apps certainly serve up great features, none of them is perfect. Meanwhile, the Internet is brimming with underdogs that are dreaming up some kick-ass new concepts—and putting them into action right now.

The rise of easier-to-use web development tools like Python and Ruby on Rails has caused an explosion of cool new web services that do everything from organizing your thoughts to tracking airfares across multiple travel sites to replacing your entire Office suite—and almost everything is free. Even as you read this, the world of web apps is expanding with cool new sites that take the features of your favorite old standbys and give them new, innovative twists. Some are terrible, but many are just plain brilliant, and we’ve narrowed down the field to 15 apps that will fundamentally change the way you use the web.

The 15 Best Web Apps You’ve Never Heard Of

Wobzip Uncompress Zip Files on the Fly

Have you thought of uncompressing your zip files online? Although, Wobzip is still in the process of development, I found it works very well and easy to use. It supports different formats of zip files, e.g. 7z, ZIP, GZIP, TAR, BZIP2, RAR, CAB, ARJ, Z, CPIO, RPM, DEB, LZH, SPLIT, CHM, ISO. After uncompressed the zip file, you can download the unzipped files easily. It has virus detection as well.

unzip.png

Include a Chart in a Webpage with Google Chart API

We have been waiting so long for Google Chart API. Google has finally released Google Charts API, which returns a PNG-format image in response to a URL. Several types of image can be generated: line, bar, and pie charts for example. For each image type you can specify attributes such as size, colors, and labels.

You can include a Chart API image in a webpage by embedding a URL within an <img> tag. When the webpage is displayed in a browser the Chart API renders the image within the page.

chart.png

The chart above is generated dynamically and displayed in your browser with the following code.
<img src="http://chart.apis.google.com/chart?cht=p3&chd=s:hW&chs=480x150&chl=Large Portion|Small Portion">
Go and check out the developer’s guide of Google Chart API now.